Work Less, Do More: Achieving the Five-Hour Day

Work Less, Do More: Achieving the Five-Hour Day

The author of our linked article, Matt Oechsli, is the writer behind How to Build a 21st Century Financial Practice: Attracting, Servicing and Retaining Affluent Clients.

The author of our linked article, Matt Oechsli, is the writer behind How to Build a 21st Century Financial Practice: Attracting, Servicing and Retaining Affluent Clients. In the current piece, he recounts a conversation with a financial advisor he was coaching. His student told him that if he could concentrate on six key tasks and nothing else, he could double his business.

And by the way: he claimed he could do it all before noon. Sound too good to be true? To prove his words, the student went out and did what he said. How about us? Can we halve our working day and achieve more lucrative results? Mr. Oechsli thinks we can and he provides the steps.

Start by analyzing how you spend your current day. Outline the tasks you undertake and determine what pulls you away from them – identifying time wasters is a key step in the process. Your goal is to define what he calls $1,000/hour activities and then delegate what’s left. These steps should help you design a model day in which you only work on the most vital tasks.

The next stage is simpler: prioritize your tasks for each coming day. Your schedule should only include actions and clients that help you meet the $1,000/hour benchmark. Anything that doesn’t make the grade should be delegated to other members of staff. Do this each day and adhere to your plan from the moment you arrive the next morning.

Finally: execute, evaluate and repeat. Work under this regime for a couple of weeks and make adjustments as required. Run your program for another two weeks and conduct another evaluation. Step-by-step, this approach should take you closer to the targeted ultra-productive, five-hour week.

For more information, please read:
How to Achieve a Five-Hour “High-Impact” Day | Wealth Management

 

A Financial Primer for 40-Year-Olds Go Independent: Advice for Advisors on Hanging Up Your Own Shingle